About Vydehi Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre

Vydehi Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre

Articles by Vydehi Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre

An evaluation of visual outcome of corneal injuries in a tertiary care hospital

Published on: 9th September, 2019

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 8257071970

Background: Corneal injuries are significant contributors to blindness. Cornea being the most anterior structure of eye is exposed to various hazards like airborne debris and blunt trauma. By understanding different types of injuries to which cornea is exposed, the practitioner maybe more capable in managing injuries to minimise structural and visual sequelae. Objectives: To study various patterns of corneal injuries and its visual outcome among patients of ocular trauma in a tertiary care hospital. Methods: Study of 100 cases of corneal injuries wherein patients were treated according to injury type and followed up for 4 months. Results: Majority of patients belonged to working population between age groups 21-65 years. Most patients suffered from corneal abrasions while the least common were perforating and lacerating injuries. Alkali injuries were more common than acid injuries. Most patient presented within 24 hours and had only epithelial defects. Therefore, the number of patients receiving conservative management was higher than those receiving surgical intervention. Conclusion: Most common causes of blindness and low vision in our study was full thickness corneal laceration and corneal abrasions, foreign body injuries affecting the pupillary area and involving anterior or mid stroma causing nebular or macular grade opacities hampering vision.
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A rare presentation of orbital dermoid: A case study

Published on: 10th August, 2021

OCLC Number/Unique Identifier: 9168714793

Introduction: A dermoid cyst is a developmental choristoma lined with epithelium and filled with keratinized material arising from ectodermal rests pinched off at suture lines. These are the most common orbital tumors in childhood. They are categorized into superficial and deep. Superficial orbital dermoid tumors usually occur in the area of the lateral brow adjacent to the frontozygomatic suture. Infrequently a tumor may be encountered in the medial canthal area [1], which is the second most common site of orbital dermoids. We report a case where a swelling presented in the medial canthal area without involving the lacrimal system. Case report: A 43 year old lady presented with complaint of swelling near the (RE; Right eye) since 2 years duration. She presented with a solitary 1.5 cm x 1 cm ovoid, non-tender, non-pulsatile, firm, non-compressible mobile swelling with smooth surface over the medial canthus of right eye. (MRI; Magnetic Resonance Imaging) brain and orbit showed right periorbital extraconal lesion and the (FNAC; Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology) suggested of Dermoid Cyst. RE canthal dermoid cyst excision was done under Local Anasthesia. Conclusion: Complete surgical excision in to be treatment of choice for dermoids. Since medial canthal mass can involve the lacrimal system, it becomes necessary to perform preoperative assessments using (CT; Computed Tomography), MRI or dacryocystography while planning the surgical approach. Silicone intubation at the beginning of the surgery is an easy and effective way of identifying canaliculi and of preventing canalicular laceration during dermoid excision if the lacrimal system is found to be involved.
Cite this ArticleCrossMarkPublonsHarvard Library HOLLISGrowKudosResearchGateBase SearchOAI PMHAcademic MicrosoftScilitSemantic ScholarUniversite de ParisUW LibrariesSJSU King LibrarySJSU King LibraryNUS LibraryMcGillDET KGL BIBLiOTEKJCU DiscoveryUniversidad De LimaWorldCatVU on WorldCat